Profiles

Agnes McMenamy Gates (1810-1860)

No excerpt.
Life events
 
Birth 1810 • Paisley, Renfrewshire, Scotland1New South Wales Government, “New South Wales, Australia, Convict Registers of Conditional and … Continue reading 3New South Wales Government, “New South Wales, Australia, Convict Indents, 1788-1842”, … Continue reading
Married 21 August 1834 • Narellan, Cumberland, New South Wales, Australia2Marriage Certificate of Joseph Gates and Nancy McNemany, 21 August 1834, NSW Registry of Births … Continue reading 4’New South Wales, Australia, Registers of Convicts’ Applications to Marry, … Continue reading
Died 28 Oct 1860 • Bonney’s Flat, South Australia, Australia5A. L. Cobiac (ed.), South Australian deaths, index of registrations 1842 to 1915, Adelaide, South … Continue reading


Biography
 
Agnes McMenamy was born in Paisley in 1810. She was also known as Nancy and her ancestry is unknown.6Her marriage certificate does not state her father and the first known contemporary records are her … Continue reading 7New South Wales Government, “New South Wales, Australia, Convict Registers of Conditional and … Continue reading 8New South Wales Government, “New South Wales, Australia, Convict Indents, 1788-1842”, … Continue reading Nancy’s childhood remains a mystery but she became a young woman who was short of stature (four feet nine and a half inches) with sandy hair, grey eyes and a fair and freckled complexion.9New South Wales Government, “New South Wales, Australia, Convict Registers of Conditional and … Continue reading 10New South Wales Government, “New South Wales, Australia, Convict Indents, 1788-1842”, … Continue reading Young Nancy received no education. She could not read, write, or sign her name.11New South Wales Government, “New South Wales, Australia, Convict Indents, 1788-1842”, … Continue reading 12Marriage Certificate of Joseph Gates and Nancy McNemany, 21 August 1834, NSW Registry of Births … Continue reading Her short stature (she was small even for contemporary standards) and lack of education is indicative of a childhood of poverty and probable nutritional deficit. These straightened circumstances may explain how, at the age of 22, she found herself at the High Court of Justiciary in Glasgow.
 
On 26 December 1832 Nancy was convicted of man robbery and sentenced to life imprisonment.13Home Office, “Australian Convict Transportation Registers – Other Fleets & Ships, … Continue reading 14New South Wales Government, “New South Wales, Australia, Convict Registers of Conditional and … Continue reading 15Home Office, “New South Wales and Tasmania, Australia, Convict Pardons and Tickets of Leave, … Continue reading 16New South Wales Government, “New South Wales, Australia, Convict Indents, 1788-1842”, … Continue reading 17Government of New South Wales, “New South Wales, Australia, Tickets of Leave, … Continue reading This paints a bleak picture of Nancy’s character. Unfortunately, the newspaper account of Nancy’s conviction has yet to be digitised (if such an account exists), which would provide greater insight about her actual crime and conviction. Carol Liston and Kathrine M. Reynolds have recently published their research regarding man robbery and convict women and their conclusion is that it was neither the crime or moral assessment that today’s historians might perceive it to be.18Carol Liston and Kathrine M. Reynolds, “Man Robbery—A Gender Signifier in Convict Australia … Continue reading
 
Nancy probably boarded the HMS Buffalo on 27 April 1833 which set sail from Portsmouth on 12 May 1833. The ship transported female convicts and arrived in Sydney on 5 October 1833.19Home Office, “Australian Convict Transportation Registers – Other Fleets & Ships, … Continue reading 20New South Wales Government, “New South Wales, Australia, Convict Registers of Conditional and … Continue reading 21Home Office, “New South Wales and Tasmania, Australia, Convict Pardons and Tickets of Leave, … Continue reading 22Government of New South Wales, “New South Wales, Australia, Tickets of Leave, … Continue reading 23Jen Willetts, ‘Convict Ship Buffalo 1833’, Free Settler or Felon, n.d., updated 18 May … Continue reading On arrival, she was assigned (‘disposed of’) to John Benton Wild (1806-1857) who had property named Vanderville in the county of Camden.24Home Office, “New South Wales, Australia, Settler and Convict Lists, 1787-1834”, Agnes … Continue reading His widow would later donate a parcel of land to create the township of the Oaks, New South Wales.25Find A Grave, database and images (https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/184281661/john-benton-wild: … Continue reading 26Anon., “Death of John Wild, Esq.”, Empire (Sydney, NSW : 1850-1875), 2 July 1857, p. 3, c. 4, … Continue reading
 
Nancy would soon come into contact with a young convict, Joseph Gates (1812-1880). Less than a year after her arrival, they were wed at Narellan, New South Wales, on 5 July 1834. This enabled them to remain together until they could obtain their freedom. The consent of the Governor of New South Wales, Lieutenant-General Sir Richard Bourke KCB, was required and obtained. Their residence was stated as Oaks, New South Wales.27Marriage Certificate of Joseph Gates and Nancy McNemany, 21 August 1834, NSW Registry of Births … Continue reading 28’New South Wales, Australia, Registers of Convicts’ Applications to Marry, … Continue reading It is interesting that Nancy and Joseph were allowed to marry so soon into her life sentence. It may be further evidence that Nancy’s conviction was based on prejudice and that she was not the hardened criminal that the sentence indicates. It also may be in part to the character of John Wild and that he was, as his obituary stated, a ‘kind master, and a true friend to the poor man’.29Anon., “Death of John Wild, Esq.”, Empire (Sydney, NSW : 1850-1875), 2 July 1857, p. 3, c. 4, … Continue reading
 
Joseph was granted his ticket of leave on 30 May 1838 while Nancy was still a convict.30Government of New South Wales, ‘New South Wales, Australia, Certificates of Freedom, … Continue reading Joseph remained in the area with Nancy (it is unclear how or if they were cohabitating) and, at some point after being granted his freedom, became a farmer.31Sydney Diocesan Archives, ‘Sydney, Australia, Anglican Parish Registers, 1814-2011’, Baptism of … Continue reading
 
Nancy must have spent some time in the marital bed as their only known child, John Gates (1842-1919), was conceived while Nancy was serving her sentence.32Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints and South Australian Genealogy and Heraldry Society, … Continue reading 33Sydney Diocesan Archives, ‘Sydney, Australia, Anglican Parish Registers, 1814-2011’, Baptism of … Continue reading She was approximately five months pregnant when granted her ticket of leave on 10 January 1842 (nine years into her life sentence) and it was around this time that she began to be known as Ann/e.34Government of New South Wales, ‘New South Wales, Australia, Tickets of Leave, … Continue reading Following the birth and baptism of John the family relocated to Bonney’s Flat, South Australia where John’s birth was registered.35Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints and South Australian Genealogy and Heraldry Society, … Continue reading Why they would undertake such an arduous relocation we will never know. Perhaps they wished to leave their convict pasts behind them and establish new lives in the colony of South Australia which was free-settled. Perhaps they saw greater opportunity. Perhaps Nancy’s decision to be known as Anne was part of this transition. The ship that brought Anne to the shores of Australia was also pivotal in the founding of her new home. The HMS Buffalo brought the first settlers to South Australia.36Diane Cummings, “HMS BUFFALO 1836”, Bound for South Australia, n.d., … Continue reading
 
Anne was granted a conditional pardon on 11 December 1847.37New South Wales Government, “New South Wales, Australia, Convict Registers of Conditional and … Continue reading This might be considered as further evidence of a hypothetically egregious conviction.38Carol Liston and Kathrine M. Reynolds, “Man Robbery—A Gender Signifier in Convict Australia … Continue reading She would live for eighteen years in the colony of South Australia. She and Joseph would have no more children and it may be that she had a torrid delivery of their son John given her tiny frame and that as a consequence she was unable to carry another child. Anne died at Bonney’s Flat at the age of 50.39South Australian Genealogy and Heraldry Society and Macbeth Genealogical Services, South Australian … Continue reading 40A. L. Cobiac (ed.), South Australian deaths, index of registrations 1842 to 1915, Adelaide, South … Continue reading Her death was registered twice (as Nancy and Anne) which may be attributed to confusion over her many aliases. Her final resting place is unknown.
 
To be continued…41This is a work in progress. Citations and family links are being batch-added to profiles.


External links
 
Agnes McMenamy at FamilySearch42The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, ‘Agnes McMenamy’, FamilySearch, n.d., … Continue reading


References   [ + ]

1, 7, 9, 14, 20, 37. New South Wales Government, “New South Wales, Australia, Convict Registers of Conditional and Absolute Pardons, 1788-1870”, Agnes alias Nancy McMenamy, 31 December 1847, New South Wales, Australia; digital image, Ancestry.com; State Records Authority of New South Wales, Kingswood, New South Wales, Australia; Card Index to Letters Received, Colonial Secretary; Reel Number: 785; Roll Number: 1250, https://search.ancestry.com.au/search/db.aspx?dbid=1657, accessed 12 January 2018.
2, 12, 27. Marriage Certificate of Joseph Gates and Nancy McNemany, 21 August 1834, NSW Registry of Births Deaths and Marriages, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia, 18/1355.
3, 8, 10, 11, 16. New South Wales Government, “New South Wales, Australia, Convict Indents, 1788-1842”, Agnes or Nancy McMenamy, New South Wales, Australia; digital image, Ancestry.com; State Records Authority of New South Wales, Kingswood, New South Wales, Australia; State Archives NSW; Series: NRS 12188; Item: [4/4018]; Microfiche: 687, Pages: 78-79, No: 610/33 161, https://search.ancestry.com.au/search/db.aspx?dbid=2024, accessed 23 January 2019.
4, 28. ’New South Wales, Australia, Registers of Convicts’ Applications to Marry, 1826-1851′, Joseph Gates alias Thomas and Agnes or Nancy McMenamy, 5 July 1834, New South Wales, Australia; digital image, Ancestry.com; State Records Authority of New South Wales, Kingswood, New South Wales, Australia; Series: 12212, Item: 4/4512, p.138, no.224,https://search.ancestry.com.au/search/db.aspx?dbid=1504, accessed 12 January 2018.
5, 40. A. L. Cobiac (ed.), South Australian deaths, index of registrations 1842 to 1915, Adelaide, South Australia, South Australian Genealogy and Heraldry Society, 2000, p.493.
6. Her marriage certificate does not state her father and the first known contemporary records are her convict records.
13, 19. Home Office, “Australian Convict Transportation Registers – Other Fleets & Ships, 1791-1868”, Agnes or Nancy McMenamy, 26 December 1832, Glasgow, Strathclyde, Scotland; digital image, Ancestry.com; The National Archives of the UK (TNA), Kew, Surrey, England; Class: HO 11; Piece: 9, p. 93, line XX, https://www.ancestry.com.au/search/collections/1180/, accessed 12 January 2018.
15, 21. Home Office, “New South Wales and Tasmania, Australia, Convict Pardons and Tickets of Leave, 1834-1859”, Agnes alias Nancy McMenamy; digital image, Ancestry.com; The National Archives of the UK (TNA), Kew, Surrey, England; Class: HO 10; Piece: 53, https://www.ancestry.com.au/search/collections/1184/, accessed 23 January 2019.
17, 22. Government of New South Wales, “New South Wales, Australia, Tickets of Leave, 1810-1869”, Ticket of Leave for Agnes alias Nancy McMenamy, 10 January 1842, Picton, New South Wales, Australia; digital image, Ancestry.com; State Records Authority of New South Wales, Kingswood, New South Wales, Australia; Number: 42/242, https://www.ancestry.com.au/search/collections/1781/, accessed 23 January 2019.
18, 38. Carol Liston and Kathrine M. Reynolds, “Man Robbery—A Gender Signifier in Convict Australia 1827–1836”, Societies, vol. 10, iss. 3, 2020, p. 48, https://doi.org/10.3390/soc10030048, accessed 3 July 2020.
23. Jen Willetts, ‘Convict Ship Buffalo 1833’, Free Settler or Felon, n.d., updated 18 May 2020, https://www.jenwilletts.com/convict_ship_buffalo_1833.htm, accessed 3 July 2020.
24. Home Office, “New South Wales, Australia, Settler and Convict Lists, 1787-1834”, Agnes or Nancy McMenamy, 5 October 1833, Vanderville, New South Wales, Australia; digital image, Ancestry.com; The National Archives of the UK (TNA), Kew, Surrey, England; Class: HO 10; Piece: 30, https://search.ancestry.com.au/search/db.aspx?dbid=1183, accessed 4 June 2020.
25. Find A Grave, database and images (https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/184281661/john-benton-wild: accessed 3 July 2020), memorial page for John Benton Wild (10 Nov 1806–26 Jun 1857), Find a Grave Memorial no. 184281661, citing Cobbitty Anglican Church Cemetery, Cobbitty, Camden Council, New South Wales, Australia; Maintained by Caroline Ruppe (contributor 48882097).
26, 29. Anon., “Death of John Wild, Esq.”, Empire (Sydney, NSW : 1850-1875), 2 July 1857, p. 3, c. 4, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article64987491, accessed 3 July 2020.
30. Government of New South Wales, ‘New South Wales, Australia, Certificates of Freedom, 1810-1814, 1827-1867’, Certificate of Freedom of Joseph alias Thomas Gates, 30 May 1838, Picton, New South Wales, Australia; digital image, Ancestry.com; State Records Authority of New South Wales, Kingswood, New South Wales, Australia; Number: 38/464, https://search.ancestry.com.au/search/db.aspx?dbid=1689, accessed 12 January 2018.
31, 33. Sydney Diocesan Archives, ‘Sydney, Australia, Anglican Parish Registers, 1814-2011’, Baptism of John Gates, 22 June 1842, Stonequarry, Camden, New South Wales, Australia; digital image, Ancestry.com; Anglican Church, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia; Page: 3, Number: 33, https://search.ancestry.com.au/search/db.aspx?dbid=61177, accessed 14 September 2018.
32, 35. Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints and South Australian Genealogy and Heraldry Society, South Australian births: registrations 1842 to 1906, CD-ROM, Adelaide, South Australia, South Australian Genealogy and Heraldry Society and Hampton, Victoria, Macbeth Genealogical Services Pty Ltd, 1998.
34. Government of New South Wales, ‘New South Wales, Australia, Tickets of Leave, 1810-1869’, Ticket of Leave of Agnes alias Nancy McMenamy, 10 January 1842, Picton, New South Wales, Australia; digital image, Ancestry.com; State Records Authority of New South Wales, Kingswood, New South Wales, Australia; Series: NRS 12202, Item: [4/4158], No. 42/242, https://www.ancestry.com.au/search/collections/1781/, accessed 4 June 2020.
36. Diane Cummings, “HMS BUFFALO 1836”, Bound for South Australia, n.d., https://bound-for-south-australia.collections.slsa.sa.gov.au/1836Buffalo.htm, accessed 3 July 2020.
39. South Australian Genealogy and Heraldry Society and Macbeth Genealogical Services, South Australian deaths: registrations 1842 to 1915, CD-ROM, Adelaide, South Australia, South Australian Genealogy and Heraldry Society and Hampton, Victoria, Macbeth Genealogical Services Pty Ltd, 2000.
41. This is a work in progress. Citations and family links are being batch-added to profiles.
42. The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, ‘Agnes McMenamy’, FamilySearch, n.d., updated 3 July 2020, https://www.familysearch.org/tree/person/details/K234-GX6, accessed 3 July 2020.